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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovere
: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we star
on water and wastewater infrastructure systems are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses, as they strive to maintain water quality and meet demand. new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny,
in the traffic center. >> good morning. we're gonna start off in daly city, northbound 280 as you come up to hickey boulevard. there's an injury crash blocking the two left lanes and the traffic leaving south san francisco getting up to daly city or if you are trying to get up to san francisco on 280, it will be a tough one. southbound 280 will be slow past the scene as you can clearly see the crash there. there's another problem on 680 southbound this morning. we had an earlier crash at 24. it was blocking lanes a little bit. and 680 was backed up, stop and go to walnut creek. if you are driving to some of the other major spots, give yourself plenty of time. this is a look at the bay bridge toll plaza and the traffic here is going to be pretty busy. it's backed up for about a 20- minute delay before you make it through. on 880, it's a little bit wet but so far this commute looks all right as you try to get into downtown oakland. stay with us. we have expanded traffic and weather all morning long. let's go to steve. >>> all right, sal. thank you. our system is moving in. there's not a lot
at an incredible rate of two to three inches an hour in some spots. >> up to 12 inches in new york city to an incredible 3 feet in parts of connecticut. boston got smacked with two feet, leaving people there with a new big dig to deal with. ron who used to live in boston will remember the big dig. it was the largest public works project in the history of mankind. we have a new project for boston now. >> an extreme weather team is where the snow is this morning. fanned out across the storm zone. with the latest on what's to come, how to handle it when you get back on the roads, as well. >> our coverage of the blizzard of 2013, sam champion and ginger zee. let's go first to sam, our weather editor in new york's columbus circle this morning. sam, good morning. >> good morning, dan and bianna. we're on a side street here. this is andrew. we've been helping him dig out from the snowfall totals. this is his car. we're going to get it out for him this morning. we have the eight inches of snow. andrew, i'll step on the other side of this. and you keep going. we got about that eight inches of sn
in this investigation. wjz is live at city police headquarters. investigator mike hellgren has the new information from detectives. mike? >> reporter: denise, this is a story that is nothing short of heartbreaking. there's a family tonight who has yet to bury a 15-year-old high school freshman. but there's also hope in new pictures, including one exclusive to wjz that police hope will solve this case. >> reporter: police released images showing the brutal attack on 15-year-old deon tay smith. they believe they showed the teen responsible for stabbing him to death outside the mcdonald's, outside of howard and fayette. smith was among the more than 200,000 ravens fans who daght -- gathered downtown to celebrate tuesday. wjz was this, as family members came to the teenager's home in east baltimore to comfort his mother. some wore memorial t-shirts. the victim's uncle remembers his nephew as a wonderful young man. >> i do not want to say anything or have the family do anything to jeopardize an ongoing investigation. this is a time for my family and for the baltim
of caution. >> in kansas city people are still trying to get themselves out of the snow dumped on them last week. now they're facing more. >> as you can see behind me what we are dealing with. >> officials are pleading with residents to stay off the road. >> we have--declared a deft as an emergency for kansas and missouri. the the texas panhandle was hit hard. take a look from amarillo. >> you can see snow drifts from 1-3 feed. >> here is a yardstick peeking out of an almost 3 ft. snowdrift. thothose who venture out have to deal with strong winds and poor visibility. is what to call a historical was it. >> imf melisa reney. >> so far this morning as f zero is only reporting a handful of delayed flights to texas. the only cancellations of all flights to kansas city. as always, if you had a fight today. call ahead and check with your carrier before heading to an airport. >> much quieter here with our weather let us turn to erica. >> before we get to our weather let us look at satellite and radar. a brutal blizzard has impacted the southern plains. another foot is expected heading into the res
that freed that little boy. victor blackwell, live from midland city, alabama this morning. i know you're very excited to be sharing this information, victor. what do we know about the raid and why law enforcement actually decided to go in? >> good morning, zoraida. two reasons primarily. the first is because authorities say they observed jimmy lee dykes with a gun and the second reason is because in the day leading up to that raid, the communications with dykes had broken down. so they realized they could not wait any longer to go in and rescue ethan. ethan is safe. this is a photograph of the 5-year-old being taken into a hospital after nearly a week being held in an underground bunker in alabama. >> he's fine. he's laughing, playing, joking, eating, the things you would expect a normal 5-year-old or 6-year-old young man to do. he's very brave, he's very lucky. the success story is that he is out safe and doing great. >> reporter: the dramatic end came after officers saw 65-year-old jimmy lee dykes holding a weapon. they felt they could not hold off any longer. >> at this point, fbi
what happened in russia. a meteor the size of a city bus streaked across the sky over the you'll mounts. nasa reporting it appeared brighter than the sun. traveling at around 40,000 miles an hour, fast enough that if you were to hitch a ride, it would get from you new york to l.a. in four minutes time flat. early estimates were it weighed ten tons. nasa says now more like 7,000. it ripped through the air like a blade through fabric triggering sonic booms and an immense shock wave when it exploded. when it shattered miles above the earth, we're told it released 20 times the energy, more powerful than the hiroshimo bomb in japan. it was powerful enough to knock down doors and shatter windows across one city. officials say more than 1,000 people went for medical treatment. flying glass blamed for most of those injuries. one witness saying when older women in the neighborhood spotted it, they started screaming that the world was ending. and just about everybody seemed a little freaked out. >> it was very confusing because the building was shaking a little bit, so initially i thought it was
residents will be able to turn in their guns for cash today. the cities of menlo park, palo alto and east palo alto will hold a gun buy back. the event is from ten to two and all weapons will be accepted anonymously. >>> anti violence groups will also hold a rally in conjunction with that. it's at 11:00. jackie spear will be among a number of speakers. >>> today's events come a day after a day of action to end gun violence. dozens of people part paided in a vigil to remember victims of gun violence. that event was part of a national movement to pressure congress for action on new gun control laws. >> new this morning in his weekly address the president said congress must act now before automatic budget cuts kick in on march first. >> once the cuts take effect, thousands of teachers will be laid off and tens of thousands of parent also have to rush to find child care for their kids. >> the president accuses republicans of failing to meet him halfway. he is calling for tax reform and moderate spending cuts. gop leaders say spending must be pulled into prevent a larger deficit. the presid
covering the major storm from all angles. we'll begin with the city that will get hit first, that is new york. alison kosik, do we understand if they're prepared? lost her. we'll go to susan candiotti in boston, another place the storm is hitting. we know there will be a lot, a lot, a lot of snow. are they ready? >> reporter: to put it bluntly, i think they are, we certainly hope they are. the city hopes bostonians are. certainly they and new englanders are used to huge nor'easters and blizzards like this. 35 years ago, you had the storm of '78, when they had more than 27 inches. this could rival those record amounts. we'll have to see what happens. but as of now, noontime is zero hour. a snow emergency has gone into effect and now people are being told that's it, get off the streets. if your car is there, it's going to ghettet towed. so certainly if take you a look at the store shelf, they are empty. it is clear that people have been fwg out within the last 24, 48 hours since these warnings began. buying all kinds of essential supplies, including nonperishable foods, water, batteries fl
. these if into effect during the day wednesday and will last in some cases through friday. from the twin cities of minneapolis and st. paul through south dakota, nebraska missouri kansas, and affecting highways 90 70 80 and 35. pretty heavy snow on the way. the storm is moving on shore today in the pacific northwest. it's coastal rain and mountain snow potentially over a foot in the sierra-nevada range. rain for los angeles coming up later tonight. then the storms moves through the rockies tonight and by early tomorrow with storms firing from austin to dallas. there could be severe weather. snow and ice starting to develop in parts of oklahoma and working up through kansas city. here's the forecast for the snowfall. starting tomorrow and lasting through the day friday, that pink area is where we could have over a foot and a half of snow with a lot of wind. blowing and drifting an issue. up toward the twin cities, maybe up to three to six inches of snow. bottom line, it looks like a mess. on the east side of the storm, there should be heavy flooding rain for the gulf coast. >>> fo
is expected to face questions from senate republicans say about his tenure at city group during its downward spiral during the 2008 financial crisis. political analysts say the growing will make for a tougher confirmation hearing and then white house officials and initially anticipated. flu would succeed to indict the are aware this resigned last month. little is currently the white house chief of staff. senators have expressed criticism of the $1 million bonus lu received shortly before see group got a $300 billion federal guarantee to take are the bank's elite mortgage-backed securities. and the report and the national hurricane center says super storm sandy was a deadly is hurricane to hit the northeast 40 years and the second most costly in the nation's history. the agency directly attribute 72 death and the u.s. from sandy at least 87 more deaths indirectly from causes like hypothermia do the power outages and taxes during cleanup efforts. the super storm also caused an estimated $50 billion in damage, the greater than any u.s. hurricane outside of katrina. >> good morning is 7:14 a.m.
protecting cops. this man is a threat to every person in los angeles. >> reporter: a city in fear is fighting back, offering a $1 million reward for dorner's capture and conviction. police have received more than 700 tips, including one that led them to this lowe's sunday night. the shooting spree began about a week ago when monica kwan and her fiance were shot to death in a parking lot. an alleged execution by dorner, who was angry at her father. a former los angeles police captain. >> to have your family targeted because they're related to you? that is absolutely terrifying. >> reporter: abc news learned that a man claiming to be dorner has called kwan's father to taunt him, telling the grieving dad he should have done a better job protecting his daughter. police have vowed to catch dorner, but for now the city can only hope the shooting doesn't start again. pierre thomas, abc news, los angeles. >> here's the scary part of this story. there are still 50 police officers whose families are being guarded. their family as are being guarded. we are talking about a force, how big and the police o
the latest from midland city, alabama. >> reporter: so often, we're telling stories that have truly tragic endings. but this day is different. this story is about a little boy's rescue. overnight, 5-year-old ethan, seen here in a photo obtained there, 42 in atlanta and had a couple of sprinkles trying to come on the of the skies here and been tough to get that and we have some clouds in the area and we'll see those dissipate in into the moring and the afternoon. we're at 50 degrees on the way and to the middle and upper 50s and with that five-day forecast, sunny in the morning and the next chance of rain on thursday. the updated computer models throughout the morning and that is information for you i will have today on channel 2 action news at noon . >> and join us throughout the morning. we're all on at with quarterback cool. >> when you're in your car, tune in to 95.5 fm and am 750 news talk wsb. >> and we'll see you again tomorrow morning at 4:30 and "good morning america" is income. have a great tuesday. eating. >> reporter: the fbi says, after a week-long standoff, it finally made the
, a chunk of space rock big enough to level a city is hurtling towards our planet eight times faster than a speeding bullet. the good news is scientists say it will miss. the scary news is, the 130,000 metric ton astroid called da-14 is the size of half a football field, and it will be much closer than the moon. in fact, it will thread the needle between earth and the roughly 600 satellites around us. the ones that your cell phone relies on, possibly even smashing one on its way by. but if that's why you're think thing is a long way from all of us way down here walking the streets, you may want to think again. the last close call turned out to be a direct hit. it was 1908, and luckily it hit the middle of nowhere, siberia, decimating 1,000 miles of trees but no people. >> if a very large astroid hit, it would probably create the same kind of disaster that wiped out the dinosaurs. >> reporter: no one knew it was headed our way until a spanish dentist and amateur astronomer randomly discovered it a year ago. nasa doesn't have the resources to look for astroids, which is why a trio of americ
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)